Crystal Caves Show Sea Levels Were Raised 50 Feet During Warm Period in History

Global Warming seems like it’s been a hot topic of discussion for the last couple of decades as we learn more about our environment and the impact we have on it as humans. Surprisingly, though, we’re not even in the warmest period the Earth has seen, and now scientists may have a better understanding of what we’re in for in the future.According to a report by Science News, the Spanish Cuevas de Artà off the Balearic island of Mallorca has revealed mineral deposits that were the result of higher water levels from long ago. Scientists have dated these deposits to a time that could be over five million years old, a period known as the Pliocene Epoch.During this Epoch, water levels were estimated to have been 16 meters (or a little more than 52 feet) higher than they are today. Temperatures were also much warmer, averaging anywhere from 3-6 degrees higher globally. There were even deposits at the highest point of the Cuevas de Artà that were almost 75 feet higher than the current sea level.

Scientists expect average temperatures to rise to the same levels experienced during the Pliocene Epoch sometime around 2100. While this is still roughly 80 years from now, it’s worth noting that humans didn’t exist five million years ago, and our advances in civilization have undoubtedly impacted our planet’s climate in some way.Alan Haywood, a Paleoclimatologist at Leeds University in England who was not involved in the study analyzed these new findings and said, “We still may not know exactly how much sea level rose.” But with results like these, “we’re getting more confidence that we’re in the right ballpark.”

Surely, there are plenty more secrets yet to be uncovered in caves all around the world. If only we had a real-life Lara Croft or Nathan Drake on hand that could do some investigating for us.Feeling adventurous? Check out 20 years of rare Tomb Raider images. And, check out the latest casting information for the upcoming Uncharted film, starring Tom Holland.

Matthew Adler is a News and Features writer for IGN. You can follow him on Twitter @matthewadler and watch him on Twitch.




Link Source: Click Here